Where Is The Grave Of Queen Boudica?

Left: Stained glass window at Colchester Town Hall. Courtesy, Colchester Castle Museum; Right: Boudicca’s monument

Boudicca, queen of Iceni people who lived in modern day Norfolk, led her tribe in about 60 AD, in a revolt against the Roman rulers of Britain.

Initially successful – destroying the cities of  London, Colchester and St Albans – the Iceni people were finally defeated  in a battle somewhere to the north-west of London.

Left: Stained glass window at Colchester Town Hall. Courtesy, Colchester Castle Museum; Right: Boudicca’s monument

The exact location of the battle is unknown. It was suggested the battle took place in the vicinity of the modern railway station of King’s Cross London. This area was previously a village known as Battle Bridge, but there is no historical evidence that this was the site of a major battle between the Romans and the Iceni tribe.

In fact, none of all suggested locations can be supported by historical evidence. It is also unclear what happened to Boudicca after the battle.

Based on records of the Roman historian, Tacitus (c. 56 AD – c. 120 AD), Boudicca survived the battle but ended her life with poison on  the battlefield after witnessing the death of her two daughters.

She was mourned throughout Britain for years.

About 150 years after the event, another Roman historian, Dio Cassius wrote that in defeat, “Boudica fell ill and died” and her followers provided her with a rich burial. Until now, no diggings have produced any archaeological evidence to support Cassius’ claim.

If rumors, started in 1937 by the expert of mythology and Celtic folklore Lewis Spence, are to be taken seriously, her body lies buried under one of the platforms at King’s Cross station, London, England.

Also, there is no archaeological evidence supporting Spence’s claim.